Resources for Older People's Organisations in London
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Age UK London invites you to a policy seminar to discuss initial research findings from our Older Private Tenants Programme funded by the Nationwide Foundation. The seminar is intended for statutory and voluntary sector staff and others with an interest in improving support for older private tenants.  It will take place on 31 October from 10.00 – 13.00 at Age UK London’s offices. You can find out more and register via the event website.

A new report “Generation Stuck”  from the International Longevity Centre – UK looks at the benefits of and obstacles to older people downsizing to a smaller home. It is partly intended to counteract some reports suggesting older people are harming younger generations by selfishly “hoarding” housing. The title “Generation Stuck” refers to many older popele being essentially stuck in their present home because of various obstacles to downsizing which the report discusses.

While previous research has explored the extent to which older people live in under-occupied properties, this report informs the debate on downsizing in later life by providing new survey research on older homeowners’ actual experiences and expectations in this respect. Amongst the key findings are:

  • One in three homeowners aged 55+ (32.6%) are considering or expect to consider downsizing. This figure rises to nearly one in two of all homeowners aged 55+ (48.2%) when factoring in those who have already downsized (15.6%). This is therefore an area worthy of greater policy focus, while the current policy debate is focused almost completely on first time buyers and starter homes.
  • Lower maintenance was the most important reason people downsized or would consider it (56.0%).
  • Close to a third (29.3%) of those who had downsized or are considering it did or expect to to release more than £100,000 in equity. Purchases from one specialist retirement housing provider, McCarthy & Stone, allowed its customers to release almost £60,000 on average from each move, with 19% releasing more than £100,000.2 Together, these figures show that releasing substantial equity can be a reality when downsizing.
  • The most prevalent way that people did or will use the equity released from downsizing is to put it into a savings account (35.2% overall) or, for those aged 55-59, to put it towards a pension (34.0%).
  • Specialist retirement housing could have a major impact on freeing up a larger housing market, with nearly 3.5 million older people interested in downsizing and buying a retirement property.

The report calls for a number of policy reforms to encourage downsizing and moving in later life, focused on the categories of adequacy, affordability and awareness, and contributes to the growing public debate on the state of the housing market in the UK.

You can download the full report from the ILC-UK website

A new report by the Ready for Ageing Alliance, a group of major charities interested in our ageing society, seeks to bust the widely touted myth that there is a uniform group of older people in the UK – so called baby boomers – who have benefitted at the expense of younger age groups.

The report presents compelling evidence that baby boomers (in this report defined as between the ages of 55-70) are in fact a diverse group of people in virtually every aspect of their lives. Inequality affects them similarly to other people in our society leading to a wide range of outcomes in their lives. You can read the report here.

Positive Ageing in London, with the UK Age Friendly Cities NetworkGreater London Authority and Manchester City Council, jointly held this event which was well received and attended by older people, policy makers and local practitioners from all over the UK and Ireland. It aimed to spread best practice on how cities and local authorities respond to ageing and to help build the Age Friendly Cities Network.

Discussions approaches to making local areas age friendly, the built environment, culture and economic development.

All of the papers from the conference, programme, speaker biographies and other information can be found here.

The Commission’s final report has been published and can be found here. It has been described (not by its authors) as a “really good succinct and punchy report with great infographics and plenty of food for thought for the whole voluntary sector NOT JUST the ageing sector”

Decision time makes a range of suggestions aimed at the voluntary sector, funders and government, to help civil society negotiate the opportunities and pitfalls posed by the UK’s ageing population. These include:

  • Charities must adapt how they work with older volunteers and donors. Today’s retirees are more discerning and discriminating than ever before about giving time and money, and charities should maintain more interactive, reciprocal relationship with the people who support them.
  • The voluntary sector should market itself as the ‘sector of choice’ for people shifting jobs in the last year before they retire. Charities could lead retraining for teachers, care-workers and other under-staffed professions.
  • Government can support the efforts of charities by considering incentives to volunteer. This may include piloting tax breaks for volunteers or carer credits.
  • Funders should pilot more early intervention projects, to identify the most effective work and prevent future problems before they emerge.

Trustees will have a key role in helping charities adapt to the changes in demographics. On 20 April 2015, New Philanthropy Capital are running a seminar for charity  trustees to explore the findings of the report, and how trustees should take forward its recommendations. Further details can be found on the event website: http://www.thinknpc.org/events/preparing-for-the-future-changing-demographics/

 

A new set of Age UK London downloadable E-bulletins are available here.  They include updates on older people’s housing, relevant health and social care changes, older people’s social contribution and ageing and equalities issues.

Age UK has published Agenda for later life 2014: http://www.ageuk.org.uk/professional-resources-home/policy/agenda-for-later-life/ 

This is the latest edition of Age UK’s comprehensive annual report on policies, practices and trends in ageing. It covers among other issues:

  • money matters
  • health and care
  • housing
  • having the opportunity to participate and be recognised as a valued member of society

Each chapter includes key global aspects of ageing as well as the national viewpoint

The Department for Work and Pensions latest monthly bulletin, the DWP Later Life Newsletter, is now out. The newsletter includes the latest news on policy changes, good practice and initiatives and their impact on older people.

You can view the newsletter, and sign up to receive it monthly, here.

The Department for Work and Pensions latest monthly bulletin, the DWP Later Life Newsletter, is now out. The newsletter includes the latest news on policy changes, good practice and initiatives and their impact on older people.

You can view the newsletter, and sign up to receive it monthly, here.

The Department for Work and Pensions latest monthly bulletin, the DWP Later Life Newsletter, is now out. The newsletter includes the latest news on policy changes, good practice and initiatives and their impact on older people.

You can view the newsletter, and sign up to receive it monthly, here.