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Brexit and Social Care Report

October 5th, 2016 | Posted by admin in Age UK London | Brexit - (0 Comments)

Independent Age has produced a report on “Brexit and the future of migrants in the social care
workforce” which reviews future workforce shortages in adult social care in England to take account
of the EU referendum result.

Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the proportion of European migrants
in the social care workforce. In the first part of 2016 alone, over 80% of all migrant care workers
who moved to England to take on a social care role were from Europe. Any restrictions to the
migration of European citizens would likely reduce the overall number of workers in the social care
sector, making it even harder to recruit and retain the necessary numbers of staff.
You can read the full report or an Executive Summary here.

The full report points out that Greater London is particularly reliant on migrant care workers with
nearly 3 in 5 of its social care workforce (59%) born abroad. This figure includes migrants from
outside the European Union.

Age UK has published a policy briefing on the possible implications of Brexit for older people.
Looking at areas like equality and human rights, health and social care services, state pensions,
private pensions, financial services, older British citizens abroad and older EU citizens in the UK, it
identifies a range of questions that will have to be answered if Brexit is to work for older
people.

Lloyds Bank has published its UK Consumer Digital Index 2016 – the first of its kind. It explores consumers’ digital and financial capability and finds that for example, there are 13.1 million people in the UK (adults of all ages)  with low financial capability and 11.1 million with low digital capability, and 3.2 million people with low capability in both these areas. Digitally excluded people, the report suggests, could save £3.7 billion annually by improving their digital skills. Two thirds of digitally excluded people are aged 60+, and the report explores the reasons for this.

You can read the full report on the website.