Resources for Older People's Organisations in London
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Positive Ageing in London and Age UK London have published a joint report looking at how older
people are shaping London boroughs’ work on the local economy. You can read the full report on PAiL’s
website. We found that in many boroughs, older people are not addressed as a specific group in
strategies on employment, volunteering, education and skills but tend to be addressed mostly as
recipients of health and social care services. Specific difficulties older people face in, for example,
the job-market, are also not adequately addressed by targets for ‘working-age’ populations. We
found promising initiatives in some boroughs and would like to see these being extended and
becoming more widespread.

It would be very interesting to hear if readers have comments either on the report, or more
generally on how older people are included in work to develop the local economy in London. If
you do, please contact Gordon Deuchars at gdeuchars@ageuklondon.org.uk.

Age UK London invites you to a policy seminar to discuss initial research findings from our Older Private Tenants Programme funded by the Nationwide Foundation. The seminar is intended for statutory and voluntary sector staff and others with an interest in improving support for older private tenants.  It will take place on 31 October from 10.00 – 13.00 at Age UK London’s offices. You can find out more and register via the event website.

Brexit and Social Care Report

October 5th, 2016 | Posted by admin in Age UK London | Brexit - (0 Comments)

Independent Age has produced a report on “Brexit and the future of migrants in the social care
workforce” which reviews future workforce shortages in adult social care in England to take account
of the EU referendum result.

Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the proportion of European migrants
in the social care workforce. In the first part of 2016 alone, over 80% of all migrant care workers
who moved to England to take on a social care role were from Europe. Any restrictions to the
migration of European citizens would likely reduce the overall number of workers in the social care
sector, making it even harder to recruit and retain the necessary numbers of staff.
You can read the full report or an Executive Summary here.

The full report points out that Greater London is particularly reliant on migrant care workers with
nearly 3 in 5 of its social care workforce (59%) born abroad. This figure includes migrants from
outside the European Union.

Age UK has published a policy briefing on the possible implications of Brexit for older people.
Looking at areas like equality and human rights, health and social care services, state pensions,
private pensions, financial services, older British citizens abroad and older EU citizens in the UK, it
identifies a range of questions that will have to be answered if Brexit is to work for older
people.

A new report “Generation Stuck”  from the International Longevity Centre – UK looks at the benefits of and obstacles to older people downsizing to a smaller home. It is partly intended to counteract some reports suggesting older people are harming younger generations by selfishly “hoarding” housing. The title “Generation Stuck” refers to many older popele being essentially stuck in their present home because of various obstacles to downsizing which the report discusses.

While previous research has explored the extent to which older people live in under-occupied properties, this report informs the debate on downsizing in later life by providing new survey research on older homeowners’ actual experiences and expectations in this respect. Amongst the key findings are:

  • One in three homeowners aged 55+ (32.6%) are considering or expect to consider downsizing. This figure rises to nearly one in two of all homeowners aged 55+ (48.2%) when factoring in those who have already downsized (15.6%). This is therefore an area worthy of greater policy focus, while the current policy debate is focused almost completely on first time buyers and starter homes.
  • Lower maintenance was the most important reason people downsized or would consider it (56.0%).
  • Close to a third (29.3%) of those who had downsized or are considering it did or expect to to release more than £100,000 in equity. Purchases from one specialist retirement housing provider, McCarthy & Stone, allowed its customers to release almost £60,000 on average from each move, with 19% releasing more than £100,000.2 Together, these figures show that releasing substantial equity can be a reality when downsizing.
  • The most prevalent way that people did or will use the equity released from downsizing is to put it into a savings account (35.2% overall) or, for those aged 55-59, to put it towards a pension (34.0%).
  • Specialist retirement housing could have a major impact on freeing up a larger housing market, with nearly 3.5 million older people interested in downsizing and buying a retirement property.

The report calls for a number of policy reforms to encourage downsizing and moving in later life, focused on the categories of adequacy, affordability and awareness, and contributes to the growing public debate on the state of the housing market in the UK.

You can download the full report from the ILC-UK website

Age UK London’s Fit 4 Purpose project produces a series of E-bulletins on issues including equalities, housing, 50+ skills and contributions. The latest series are on the Age UK London website now.

 

 

The Department for Work and Pensions latest monthly bulletin, the DWP Later Life Newsletter, is now out. The newsletter includes the latest news on policy changes, good practice and initiatives and their impact on older people.

You can view the newsletter, and sign up to receive it monthly, here.

The Department for Work and Pensions latest monthly bulletin, the DWP Later Life Newsletter, is now out. The newsletter includes the latest news on policy changes, good practice and initiatives and their impact on older people.

You can view the newsletter, and sign up to receive it monthly, here.

The Department for Work and Pensions latest monthly bulletin, the DWP Later Life Newsletter, is now out. The newsletter includes the latest news on policy changes, good practice and initiatives and their impact on older people.

You can view the newsletter, and sign up to receive it monthly, here.

A new website has been launched comparing Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) data across the country: http://ascof.hscic.gov.uk/Outcome This is intended to help people to find out more about care services in different places. It would be interesting to know if anyone finds it useful!